Managing Invasive Weeds Workshop

Photo by Peggy Schochet, Garlic Mustard is becoming a pesky biennial weed to deal with in gardens and landscapes as well as in the woods

Master Gardeners offer program in Fauquier

June 19 and 26, plan to attend both sessions

The Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE), Virginia Department of Forestry (DOF) and Fauquier and Rappahannock Master Gardeners are offering a program, Managing Invasive Weeds Workshop on Tuesday, June 19 and Tuesday, June 26 at 6:00 p.m. in Warrenton.  The class will be two successive Tuesday evenings and participants should plan to attend both days.

Invasive plants are non-native plants with high reproductive potential that are able to outcompete our native species for sunlight, nutrients and real estate.  They often produce large quantities of seed, have aggressive root systems, thrive in disturbed areas and some even produce chemicals that make it difficult for other plants to grow near them.

Come and learn more about how to manage the invasive plant bullies in garden and forest areas.  The training will cover the biology and identification of many weedy plants. Hands-on practice and a review of safe practices around chemical use will be offered.  Participants will have a chance to practice measuring and mixing these herbicides as well as how to apply them with various types of equipment.

The fee for the training is $30 and includes resource materials and refreshments. Individuals may register on-line at: https://register.ext.vt.edu/search/publicCourseSearchDetails.do?method=load&courseId=113545&selectedProgramAreaId=25580&selectedProgramStreamId=

Individuals may also register by stopping by the VCE office at 24 Pelham Street in Warrenton to complete the registration process and make payment with cash or check made payable to Treasurer of Virginia Tech.

The program is open to the public, and will take place rain or shine.   It is recommended to register early as space is limited. Dress to be active and go outside both workshop days.


EIGHT HIGHLY INVASIVE PLANTS COMMONLY SEEN IN FAUQUIER COUNTY:

Tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima)

Autumn Olive (Elaeagnus umbellate)

Japanese Stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum)

Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolate)

Wineberry (Rubus phoenicolasius)

Multiflora Rose (Rosa multiflora)

Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus)

Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica)


About the Virginia Cooperative Extension

Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

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